France is sending a new Statue of Liberty to the US for July 4, but this time it’s mini

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Lady Liberty has a “little sister” and she’s on her way to the U.S. from France.

A near 10-foot replica of the Statue of Liberty will be making two holiday appearances this summer, according to a joint press release from the Embassy of France in Washington, D.C., the National Conservatory of Arts and Crafts and logistics company CMA CGM Group.

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The bronze recreation, which was made from the same plaster model that French sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi used when he created the original landmark statue in 1878, will be displayed in New York City and the District of Columbia for a limited time this summer.

Lady Liberty has a "little sister" and she’s on her way to the U.S. from France for a limited time. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Lady Liberty has a “little sister” and she’s on her way to the U.S. from France for a limited time. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Unlike her brief stop in NYC, visitors will have at least 10 years to see the replica in the nation’s capital, according to the Associated Press.

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In an email to Fox News, French Ambassador Philippe Etienne wrote, “I am truly honored to receive this symbol of the friendship of the French and American peoples.”

He went on to add that the Statue of Liberty is a symbol that “enlightens the world” and has “a value [that’s] still so necessary.” 

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Before it was decided that the replica would be calling Washington, D.C. a temporary home, the 1,000-pound statue had been on display for a decade at the Musée des Arts et Métiers, a French industrial design museum in Paris.

The replica was crafted by Susse Fondeur, a French foundry that used a “lost wax method” to capture the statue’s fine details, according to a New York Times article from 2011.

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It has been 135 years since the original Statue of Liberty opened to the public on Ellis Island. The 305-foot monument greeted nearly 14 million immigrants who entered the U.S. through New York from 1886 to 1924, according to the National Park Service.