Rep. Salazar, daughter of Cuban exiles, says ‘evils of communism’ cannot be whitewashed in schools

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Florida Congresswoman Maria Salazar applauded her state governor, Ron Desantis, for announcing that he will require schools to teach civics and the “evils of communism.”

“Bravo,” Salazar said during an appearance on “Fox & Friends.”

Salazar, who is the daughter of Cuban exiles, said that every single governor in the United States should “follow suit” with DeSantis in order to educate American youths on the perils of communism, socialism, and totalitarianism. 

FLORIDA WILL REQUIRE SCHOOLS TO TEACH CIVICS AND ‘EVILS OF COMMUNISM’

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She asserted that half of American teens believe that communism and socialism are good and most cannot tell the difference between the Communist Manifesto and the Declaration of Independence. 

Polling over the last few years appears to bolster Salazar’s claim.

According to a 2019 YouGov poll, 57% of 23 to 38-year-olds believe the Declaration of Independence better “guarantees” freedom and equality compared to the Manifesto, and only 50% viewed capitalism favorably. 

The September 2020 YouGov poll found that within the ages 16 to 23, support for socialism increased 9% throughout the 2020 pandemic single from 40% in 2019 to 49%.

“I am the daughter of political refugees,” Salazar told Brian Kilmeade. “Everyone that I know that surrounds me in my district understands what DeSantis is saying. It’s oppression, it’s exile, it’s death.”

Salazar added that people need to avoid “whitewashing” socialism and get involved to teach children that historical communist leaders, including Joseph Stalin, Mao Zedong, and Fidel Castro, were murderers.

“I want the rest of the United States to understand that the American exceptionality works for everyone.—from California to Florida.”

In addition to DeSantis’ announcement that new state programs for students will require civics, patriotism education, and CPR training, the Florida governor also signed a bill that will allow students to record college professors’ as evidence in complaints about political bias to the universities.