‘Ring of Fire’ solar eclipse stuns viewers around world

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The “Ring of Fire” solar eclipse stunned skywatchers around the world Thursday morning. 

In a cloudy New York City, the partial eclipse peeked from behind gray, puffy clouds as residents commuted to work.

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Images from social media showed the eclipse behind bridges, illuminating red dawn skies and as a backdrop to iconic landmarks.

A partial solar eclipse rises over the Baltimore skyline, Thursday, June 10, 2021, seen from Arbutus, Md. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

A partial solar eclipse rises over the Baltimore skyline, Thursday, June 10, 2021, seen from Arbutus, Md. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

It appeared as if the moon had taken a “bite” of the sun: obscuring just a portion of the hot ball of glowing gases.

U.S. viewers looked to the eastern horizon to observe the eclipse, and NASA cautioned that the use of special eclipse glasses would be necessary to avoid the threat of blindness.

A man wears special glasses to watch the partial solar eclipse in Trafalgar Square in London, Thursday, June 10, 2021. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

A man wears special glasses to watch the partial solar eclipse in Trafalgar Square in London, Thursday, June 10, 2021. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

The next and final solar eclipse of the year will take place on Dec. 4, with totality only visible from Antarctica and southern Africa.

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The next total solar eclipse visible from the U.S. will be on Apr. 8, 2024.